Effect of Constant Magnetic Field and Magnetohydrodynamic Convection on Electrolytic Hydrogen Evolution Reaction

Summary

Water electrolysis is the chemical decomposition of water into hydrogen and oxygen gas by passing an electric current onto the electrode that is submerged in an electrolyte, which is an aqueous ionic liquid. It is one of the most promising ways of producing hydrogen due to its cost-efficiency, especially since electrolysis can occur by using nickel and iron electrodes under a low voltage. The purpose of the experiment was to incorporate the presence of an externally applied Constant Magnetic Field during electrolysis to engender Hydrogen Evolution Reaction (HER) and investigate its effect on the rate of hydrogen gas production over a given period of time.

In the experiment, different magnitudes of CMF produced by a variable gap magnet were exposed to a Hoffmann voltammeter under a constant voltage supply to electrolyze water and engender HER. To account for minor thermodynamic discrepancies due to variable temperature and pressure, the experiment was conducted in the SATP and with 12 volts voltage supply throughout 3 minutes – to take into consideration the limited volume capacity of the Hoffmann voltammeter.

Analyzed results show that magnetic catalysis via CMF had a significant effect on the rate of hydrogen gas production. Moreover, it corroborates that the greater the magnitude of CMF the greater the rate of HER. Consequently, the proposition that a CMF could promote HER further addresses the efficiency of magneto-electrolysis as a sustainable means of hydrogen gas production.

Question / Proposal

How can we increase the efficiency of hydrogen production for commercial use? How does Constant Magnetic Field affect the rate of hydrogen gas yield in alkaline water electrolysis? Can this reaction be used to sustainably promote hydrogen gas as a renewable alternative to conventional hydrocarbon fuels?

Research

Method / Testing and Redesign

Results

Conclusion

About me

Personally, my passion for science had incessantly grown since childhood. When I was in middle school, I spent my pastime exploring various branches of science and doing minuscule science projects. From building multiple models of the trebuchet and Archimedes pump to creating burglar alarms and earthquake alarms with intricate sensors. I always loved exploring scientific principles behind each reaction and I profoundly admired the variety of methods science could be applied for everyday challenges. Specifically, the reason behind my fascination with physical chemistry is the interdisciplinary nature of this field, which gives way to endless approaches to tackling complex global issues by amalgamating concepts from the two subjects. For instance, calculations of optimal current density to be supplied to a voltameter (physics) can be paired with the identification of optimal electrolyte (chemistry) to carry out the most efficient electrolysis reaction. Consequently, by delving deeper into physical chemistry, I was able to express my creative side and quench my intellectual curiosity.

The scientists and engineers I deeply admire and am inspired by are Leonardo Da Vinci, Nikola Tesla and Thomas Alva Edison, and A. P. J. Abdul Kalam - who built his path to success from humble beginnings. My future career plan is to pursue a doctorate degree in chemical engineering with minors in business management, material science, electrical and computer engineering. Winning this Science Fair would mean a lot to me, and the prizes would tremendously help me explore more innovative and sustainable solutions for the 21st Century Grand Challenges.

Health & Safety

The laboratory I mainly worked on for conducting most of my pilot experiments and testings is my high school laboratory, in Sekolah Pelita Harapan International Sentul City, Babakan Madang, Sentul City, Bogor, West Java, Indonesia. The manager of the lab is Mr. David Timothy and he has been working in my school's lab for an extensive amount of time. I have also worked with an adult mentor - Mr. Ivan Pattiasina - who has been helpful for me in explaining all the lab safety precautions and the methodology in using various PASCO scientific equipment. He is an experienced mentor and has a high proficiency in lab safety.

I have mostly used the school's laboratory for experimentation and have dealt with chemical substances with utmost precaution. For instance, I wore safety goggles, sterilized gloves, and conducted the experiment in a ventilated area. Moreover, to prevent injuries to my finger when positioning the metal plates near the variable gap magnet.

 

The guidelines I am following in the creation process and when handling microbial and chemical substances are present in the following urls:

http://www.studygs.net/labsafety.htm

http://www.uft.org/chapters/lab-specialists/lab-safety-rules-for-students

http://www.stonybrook.edu/ehs/lab/

https://www.csun.edu/science/ref/laboratory/safety/safety.html

Chemical identifiers of Potassium Hydroxide: https://cameochemicals.noaa.gov/chemical/9013

Bibliography, references, and acknowledgements

The laboratory I mainly worked on for conducting most of my pilot experiments and testings is my high school laboratory, in Sekolah Pelita Harapan International Sentul City, Babakan Madang, Sentul City, Bogor, West Java, Indonesia. The manager of the lab is Mr. David Timothy and he has been working in my school's lab for an extensive amount of time. I have also worked with an adult mentor - Mr. Ivan Pattiasina - who has been helpful for me in explaining all the lab safety precautions and the methodology in using various PASCO scientific equipment. He is an experienced mentor and has a high proficiency in lab safety.

I would like to express my gratitude towards my parents, who have been very supportive of my project at home. Also, to my Physics and Chemistry teachers, Mr. Ivan Pattiasina and Ms. Yulvita Hadi Yarti, as well as my lab manager, Mr. David Timothy, for providing inputs regarding the theoretical and practical aspects (respectively) of the experiment. I would also like to extend my thanks to my classmate, Abelhard Jauwena, who kindly devoted time for peer evaluating my project through multiple drafts.